Dentists Sumter SC

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Dentists. You will find informative articles about Dentists, including "Emergency dental tips". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Sumter, SC that can help answer your questions about Dentists.

Ray Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
(803) 773-5413
625 Constitution Drive
Sumter, SC
Specialty
Holistic dentist

Data Provided By:
R Mark Lee, DDS
(803) 494-8466
5635 BROAD ST
Sumter, SC
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
David M Van Patten, DMD
(803) 469-3555
308 West Wesmark Blvd
Sumter, SC
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
R Charles Hurst, DMD
(803) 469-2060
360 W Wesmark Blvd
Sumter, SC
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
Eddie C Du Rant, DDS
(803) 773-3328
852 W Liberty St
Sumter, SC
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
Dr.THADDEUS VINCENT
(803) 494-9656
5635 Broad Street
Sumter, SC
Gender
M
Speciality
Dentist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.5, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Walter B Fingar, DMD
(803) 494-8466
5635 BROAD ST
Sumter, SC
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
William T Noonan, DMD
(803) 469-2070
308 W Wesmark Blvd
Sumter, SC
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
Lisbeth Poag, D.M.D.
500 Physicians Ln.
Sumter, SC
Specialties
Pediatric Dentistry
Office Hours
Monday: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Tuesday: 12:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Wednesday: 4:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Thursday: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Friday: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Saturday: -
Sunday: -
PracticeName
Carolina Children's Dentistry, L.L.C.

Data Provided By:
Kool Smiles of Sumter
(888) 891-8057
1121 Broad Street
Sumter, SC
Description
Find a local Kool Smiles general dentist for kids and adults, who accepts Medicaid, Tricare, SCHIP and most insurance. Call today.
Phone Hours
MON - FRI 7:00AM - 9:00PM; SAT 8:00AM - 12:00PM; SUN 12:00PM - 6:00PM

Data Provided By:

Emergency dental tips

It can happen any time, anywhere—a dental crisis. Ideally, regular dental checkups will catch problems before you wake up in pain at 2:00 a.m., but your dentist can’t anticipate everything. Here are some tips for surviving the unexpected.

Toothache
Generally, a toothache occurs if tooth decay is very close to or has penetrated the pulp chamber that contains nerves and tiny blood vessels. There are many over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers to cure toothaches. Most common are paracetamol, aspirin, and acetaminophen. If you feel that a small swelling has occurred, you may take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) for their inflammatory components, like ibuprofen, (Advil, Aleve) and mefenamic acid. However, those with a history of ulcers as well as pregnant women need a doctor's recommendation before taking NSAID and aspirin. Do not rub aspirin on your gums. Aspirin contains salicylic acid, which can burn and damage gum tissue. For general pain relief, it's a better idea to simply swallow the aspirin, or stop by a pharmacy for pain-relieving gels like Anbesol or Orajel.

Other home remedies for a toothache include rinsing your mouth with salt water or dabbing some clove oil directly on the bad tooth. Clove oil has bacteria-slaying properties, along with a remarkable numbing effect. Years ago, dentists would dab clove oil over a tooth before putting a filling in it. Another home remedy is the numbing power in cooled peppermint tea. Swish, then swallow if you like the flavor. You can try putting ice on the area, but the temperature of the ice could send you over the edge.

If you think your toothache is caused by trapped food, rinse the area with warm water and swish it about. Flossing between the teeth should dislodge the food or it may loosen whatever is causing the pain.

A lost filling or crown

If you lose a filling, it's not worth saving. Just cover the hole with temporary material like softened chewing gum or Dentemp, do not try to put the old filling back in the tooth. If you lose a crown, you'll want to try and salvage it (you can use Temparin or Dentemp, available over-the-counter in pharmacies, to put the crown back in place until you can reach a dentist). In either case, visit the dentist as soon as possible. Many people don't realize that when a filling falls out, there's a problem, whether it's a cracked tooth or something more severe. You need to see a dentist.

Broken teeth
If you've knocked out a tooth, shake off debris (rinsing or scrubbing could remove important periodontal ligament), place it in a container of milk or back in its socket and try to reach the dentist within 30 minutes. Unfortunately, not all teeth can be saved.

If you've broken a tooth and you've lost the broken piece, just get to the dentist. If you have it, gently shake off surface dirt and keep it. Even if the piece can't be bonded back to the original tooth, it can be used to help re-create the look of that tooth.

Canker sores or sore gums
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